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Mexican Marimba, The

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Genre: Percussion Ensemble
# of Players: 3
Level: Medium | Duration: 1:30-3:00 each
Publisher: C. Alan Publications

Download mp3 | Click on images to left for score sample

Price:
$25.00
Item #:
20460
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Notes & Instrumentation
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  • Notes & Instrumentation

    Written for one 4-octave marimba, the arrangements in The Mexican Marimba attempt to recreate the traditional marimba style of street musicians so common in larger cities of Mexico. Street musicians make their living by playing at restaurants and other locations frequented by local persons and tourists. Since these groups often move from location to location, the smaller marimba tenore is preferred, thus the arrangements for 4-octave instrument.

    Genre: Percussion Ensemble | # of Players: 3
    Level: Medium | Duration: 1:30-3:00 each

    Instrumentation
    3 players on one 4-octave Marimba

    Program Notes
    The arrangements in The Mexican Marimba are written for a four-octave marimba (C3-C7) and attempt to recreate the traditional marimba style of street musicians so common in larger cities of Mexico. Street musicians make their living by playing at restaurants and other locations frequented by local persons and tourists. Since these groups often move from location to location, the smaller marimba tenore is preferred. This size of marimba generally has C2 as its lowest note but may extend five octaves above that.

    A maximum of three musicians will play the marimba with occasional supplemental percussion. The bass and harmony parts are played by one person—bass notes played by a single mallet in the left hand and harmony notes played by two mallets in the right hand. The remaining two players focus on the melody and supporting harmony notes.

    The melody in this music is generally treated in one of four ways:
    1. The melody may simply be played in octaves by both parts;
    2. The melody along with harmony notes may be played by Parts 1 and 2 in octaves;
    3. One part plays the melody and the other the harmony;
    4. Part 1 plays the melody in the right hand with the next lower note of the chord underneath, and Part 2 plays the melody an octave lower in the left hand with the next higher note of the chord above. This method involves a lot of parallel motion that often introduces non-harmonic tones that add dissonance and color to the sound.

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