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Queen of the Night's Aria (Mozart)

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Genre: Solo Flute with Band
# of Players: Standard + 1
Level: 3.5 | Duration: 3:10
Publisher: G & M Brand | Copyright: 1993

Download mp3 | Click on images to left for score sample

Price:
$70.00
Item #:
R10126
Quantity:
Notes & Instrumentation
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  • Notes & Instrumentation

    Showcase a flute soloist with this inspired arrangement of the Queen of the Night's Aria. The aria "I'll Have Revenge" (Der Hölle Rache") is sung by the Queen of the Night in the second act of Mozart's opera "The Magic Flute."

    Genre: Solo Flute with Band | # of Players: Standard + 1
    Level: 3.5 | Duration: 3:10

    Instrumentation
    1st Flute (SOLO)

    2nd Flute (Piccolo)
    1st Oboe
    2nd Oboe*
    1st Bb Clarinet
    2nd Bb Clarinet
    3rd Bb Clarinet
    Bb Bass Clarinet*
    1st Bassoon
    2nd Bassoon*
    1st Eb Alto Saxophone
    2nd Eb Alto Saxophone*
    Bb Tenor Saxophone
    Eb Baritone Saxophone*

    1st Bb Trumpet
    2nd Bb Trumpet
    3rd Bb Trumpet*
    1st F Horn
    2nd F Horn
    3rd F Horn
    4th F Horn*
    1st Trombone
    2nd Trombone*
    3rd Trombone
    Euphonium
    (TC Baritone)
    Tuba

    Timpani

    Parts marked with as asterisk (*) are NOT ESSENTIAL, although their presence will obviously enable a fuller realization of the composer's intentions to be achieved.

    Program Notes
    The aria "I'll Have Revenge" (Der Hölle Rache") is sung by the Queen of the Night in the second act of Mozart's opera "The Magic Flute." The Queen of the Night is one of Mozart's most famous operatic figures, which is rather surprising as she sings only two arias in the entire opera. However, it is the style of these arias which has made the character justifiably famous: both are extremely virtuosic and require a high range and great vocal flexibility - a coloratura. Mozart probably wrote the arias in this way to represent the external glitter but inner hardness of the Queen. She first appears seemingly as a representative of the forces of good and light, and only in the second act of the opera do we discover that she is the symbol of darkness and superstition.

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