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Now is the Day

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Genre: Band
# of Players: Standard
Level: 2 | Duration: 3:40
Publisher: G & M Brand | Copyright: 1998

Download mp3 | Click on images to left for score sample

Price:
$45.00
Item #:
R10202
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Notes & Instrumentation
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  • Notes & Instrumentation

    Warlike, then noble, Now is the Day is based on the great figure in Scottish history - William Wallace, often called Braveheart. Opening with the woodwinds playing drums along with the percussion section against brass fanfares, this piece will create an air of excitement. An alto saxophone solo provides a brief moment of solace between the battle scenes.

    Genre: Band | # of Players: Standard
    Level: 2 | Duration: 3:40

    Instrumentation
    1st Flute
    2nd Flute/Oboe*
    1st Bb Clarinet
    2nd Bb Clarinet
    3rd Bb Clarinet
    Bb Bass Clarinet*
    Eb Alto Saxophone*
    Bb Tenor Saxophone*

    1st Bb Trumpet
    2nd Bb Trumpet
    1st F Horn
    2nd F Horn
    Trombone
    Euphonium
    (TC Baritone)
    Tuba

    Timpani (2)
    Percussion 1 (snare drum)
    Percussion 2 [2 players] (tom tom, bass drum, suspended cymbal)

    Piano*

    Parts marked with an asterisk (*) are NOT ESSENTIAL, although their presence will obviously enable a fuller realization of the composer's intention to be achieved.

    Program Notes
    This work is based on a great figure in Scottish history - William Wallace, often called Braveheart. The song "Scots wha hae wi' Wallace bled," which is Scotland's unofficial national anthem contains the line "Now is the day and how is the hour," and this is the source of the title.

    The opening section is warlike in sound with woodwinds playing tambours of some sort - tom-toms, tambours, even old drum skins will make the kind of noise required to simulate a battle. Noisy brass fanfares are melodic fragments of "Scots wha hae" melody. Eventually, woodwinds join in and the music slows down to an alto saxophone solo, again based on fragments of "Scots wha hae." The battle tempo resumes and percussion then lead the band noisily into an eventual full statement of the theme creating a noble sound against the continuing drum patterns, leading to a triumphant ending.

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